Murphy man arrested for sexual assault of a minor

News, Press Release
sexual assault
Murphy, NC— Sheriff Derrick Palmer announced the October 1, 2020 arrest of 39-year-old Robin Farmer Stalcup, of Murphy, North Carolina on charges of sexual assault a minor child.
In June 2020 a complaint was made with the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office of an allegation of a sexual assault of a minor child. Pursuant to this allegation, the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office conducted an investigation which identified Stalcup as suspect in the case. As the case was being investigated assistance was provided by HAVEN Child Advocacy Center.
The case was presented to the Cherokee County Grand Jury on 9/28/2020 and a true bill of indictment for the arrest of Stalcup was issued.
Stalcup surrendered himself to the Cherokee County Detention Center and the indictment for Indecent Liberties with a Child was served on him. The North Carolina Magistrate set a $5,000.00 unsecured bond and Stalcup was released. Stalcup is to be in Cherokee County Superior Court on December 14, 2020.
Stalcup was served with 2012 misdemeanor warrants for Breaking and Entering and Assault and Battery and bond was set at $1,000.00 unsecured. The court date on the misdemeanor charges is set for October 15, 2020.
Sheriff Derrick Palmer stated, “Due to the age of the victim and nature of the crime we will not be making any further press releases in this case.”
To report suspicious activity and suspect violations of the law please call 828-837-1344 or submit a tip at [email protected]

MOTHER, DAUGHTER AND SON ARRESTED FOR ABDUCTING A CHILD

BREAKING NEWS, Featured, Featured Stories
Murphy, NC— Sheriff Derrick Palmer announced the September 08, 2020 arrest of 29 year old (below L-R) Charles Anthony Payne, and the September 10, 2020 arrest of 62 year old Carol Lynn Bruce and 33 year old Patricia Ann Waldroup for charges involving the abduction of a minor child.
 
On September 07, 2020 after 6 pm a report was made to the Cherokee County Sheriff’s that a minor child was missing and possibly had run away. As the investigation continued information was made know that Payne and Waldroup were the last known persons to have seen the child in the early hours of September 07, 2020. Payne was arrested at this point and taken to the Cherokee County Detention Center and charged with Felonious Restraint and placed under a $20,000 secure bond.
On September 08, 2020 during the early morning hours deputies and detectives along with family members began searching the area where the child was reported to have been dropped off by Payne and Waldroup. Within a few hours of the beginning of the search the child was located and taken for medical evaluation.
During the investigation additional information was made known that Bruce had made a threat to one of the witness in the investigation in an attempt to prevent the witness from testifying. On September 10, 2020 Bruce (mother to Waldroup and Payne) was arrested for Intimidation of a Witness and taken to the Cherokee County Detention Center and placed under a $20,000 secure bond. Additionally, Waldroup was also arrested on September 10, 2020 for Felonious Restraint and taken to the Cherokee County Detention Center where she was confined under a $20,000 secure bond.
Sheriff Derrick Palmer stated “This investigation is far from over. We are continuing to pursue several leads and anticipate additional charges. We do want to thank Hanging Dog Fire Department, Cherokee County EMS and Mapping, Jackson County NC Sheriff’s Office, Haywood County Sheriff’s Office, Polk County and Bradley County TN Sheriff’s Offices, and North Carolina Wildlife, who responded with tracking animals and other tools to help us bring the child back to safety. Due to the age of the victim we will not be making any further press releases.”
To report suspicious activity and suspect violations of the law please call 828-837-1344 or submit a tip at [email protected]

Cooper Announces Nearly $40 million to Connect Students and Communities to High-Speed Internet

News, Press Release
COVID-19 relief funds internet

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper announced nearly $40 million in funding for NC Student Connect, a new partnership created to address internet connectivity gaps that are a barrier to remote learning for many North Carolina students. When school resumed in August, superintendents estimated that at least 100,000 students still lacked a reliable internet connection at home.

Many North Carolina students are currently attending school remotely and need reliable internet access to be able to connect with their teachers and access their lessons. Students who are attending school onsite may also need internet access at home to be able to complete assignments.

“Long before COVID-19, expanding access to high-speed internet has been a top priority for my administration, and this pandemic has made the need even more urgent,” said Governor Cooper. “NC Student Connect will make critical investments in high speed internet access and remote learning that will help students, health care and businesses in our state.”

Today’s NC Student Connect investment includes:

  • $30 million to distribute 100,000 wireless high speed hot spots for students to connect with their remote learning classes.
  • $8 million to create accessible sites in convenient locations across the state such as school parking lots, municipal areas, and state parks, museums and historic sites. These NC Student Connect sites will provide free high-speed internet for students to connect to the Internet to download lessons and complete assignments offline.
  • $2 million for educator professional development, parent training and student involvement in a spectrum of activities that go into effective remote learning. More than 1,300 educators from rural North Carolina already participated in a virtual conference focused on remote learning to help them be better prepared to teach throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about that conference.

NC Student Connect is a partnership across state government including the Department of Information Technology (DIT), the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (DNCR), Governor Cooper’s Hometown Strong initiative and the NC Business Committee for Education (NCBCE), an educational nonprofit in the Governor’s Office. These and other agencies have already worked to build partnerships to help leverage public investments to increase internet access in underserved communities. Purchasing began before Labor Day and thousands of hot spots will be shipped to school systems this week and will continue throughout the month.

“This announcement illustrates the state’s unwavering commitment in connecting all our students and all of NC,” said DIT Acting Secretary Thomas Parrish. “There’s no greater action than investing in our children, our future world changers. We are grateful to our private partners, and all those who are assisting in this effort; our tomorrow says thank you.”

“As a parent with a child that is remote learning at home, I can testify to the urgent need for devices with high speed connectivity,” said DNCR Secretary Susi Hamilton. “As a leader in State government, I can answer the Governor’s call to help school children by lending them devices through our State Library and add to their learning experience through outdoor and cultural programming that this department offers.”

“Today’s actions significantly advance Governor Cooper’s commitment to quality, accessible high-speed internet for every North Carolina school district. Our Remote Learning Working Group continues to produce meaningful solutions for our most marginalized students. The time is now for bold, innovative, and collaborative solutions that deliver high-speed internet to every North Carolina home,” said Jeremy Collins, Director of Innovative Connectivity with Hometown Strong.

“Google is proud to work with our state, local, and corporate partners to provide innovative connectivity solutions—such as our Rolling Hotspots program in North Carolina—to help students access Wi-Fi. NCBCE’s Remote Learning Working Group is thrilled that the state will invest in the NC Student Connect Program and provide professional development for educators as part of a collective effort to make it possible for more students to engage in school work remotely,” said Lilyn Hester, Head of External Affairs – Southeast, Google, who serves as vice chairwoman of NCBCE and Chairwoman of the NCBCE Remote Learning Working Group.

Initial private sector investments in remote learning and NC Student Connect include, AT&T, Duke Energy Foundation, Fidelity Investments, Google, Smithfield Foundation, Verizon Foundation, and Wells Fargo Foundation.

5.1 magnitude earthquake rocks North Carolina

News
5.1 magnitude earthquake

MURPHY, NC – At 8:07 a.m. on August 9, 2020, many North Carolinians were rattled by a 5.1 magnitude earthquake, originating two miles outside of Sparta, NC.

According to the National Weather Service, this quake is the strongest to hit NC since 1916. It was 5.2. magnitude earthquake in Buncombe county and it toppled chimneys and people ran into the streets

At this time, no injuries or major damage have been reported. If you felt it, report it to the USGS. 

Residents from Murphy and Hayesville have reported experiencing tremors at the time of the earthquake. Additionally, Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee felt the effects of the morning quake. Georgia reports include Dahlonega and as far as Fayetteville.

Sparta is 272 miles from Murphy, NC, 264 miles from Hayesville, and 165 miles from Asheville. The city sits close to the NC/Tenn. line.

Another smaller 2.6 magnitude earthquake occurred in the same area at 1:57 a.m.

National Weather Service out of Raleigh has also reported three other possible quakes in Guilford, Randolph, and Moore counties.

If you felt the earthquake this morning or experienced any damage, please let us know!

The most recent earthquake in the Triangle was in 2011 in Virginia. Its magnitude was 5.8.

Gov. Cooper leaves athletics decision up to NCHSAA

Murphy Bulldogs, Murphy High, Sports, TeamFYNSports
mhs

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper held a press conference earlier today, where he announced that school systems will be operating on Plan B which is a split, virtual and in person system this fall. School districts are also allowed to operate under plan C, which is strictly virtual online learning. Regarding sports, he announced that he is leaving the decision about whether or not to have upcoming athletics seasons to the North Carolina High School Athletic Association (NCHSAA).

Cooper stated,“The NCHSAA will be making the decisions about high school sports and what they’re going to engage in.” He went on to say, “I love fall sports and enjoyed playing them in high school. I know a lot of our student-athletes want to get back into playing sports. NCHSAA will be consulting with public health experts, including our staff here at the Department of Health and Human Services. It’s my understanding that they will be making specific decisions a little bit later on in the process.”

Plan B is what the Governor has implemented going forward, which will probably work out to where about 50% of students will be taking classes in person and the other 50% will be taking online classes. Earlier this month Que Tucker, the NCHSAA commissioner, said earlier this month that Plan B would be the most concerning if implemented because it leaves so much unknown.

She also commented, “By Aug. 17, if we have an understanding from NCDHHS that we can proceed with higher-risk sports and what those health and safety guidelines would be, we could then move forward and be able to play some games. If you back up from that, when the governor makes an announcement, we’ll have a better feel for the Aug. 1 date for first official practice for fall sports or whether we’d have to push things back to Aug. 15 or Sept. 1 I try not to draw any lines in the sand or cross any lines. If we get an Oct. 1 date, for example, to go ahead and play some sports, it would be incumbent upon us as a staff to put together some sort of a schedule for those kids to play, even if it’s a month or a month and a half, and end with a conference championship. But it’s not fair to students or coaches to preempt what the governor and his team are trying to do to keep us safe as North Carolinians.”

North Carolina will remain in phase 2 of the reopening process for three more weeks, which leaves the NCHSAA operating under phase one of their plan.

Phase One of reopening North Carolina begins on May 8

Business
phase one

RALEIGH, N.C. – Starting at 5 p.m. on Friday, May 8, residents of N.C. will have certain restrictions lifted as the state moves toward reopening.

In Phase One, the distinction between essential and non-essential businesses is removed and individuals can leave their homes for any commercial activity that is open. Small outdoor gatherings are allowed, but gatherings more than 10 are still prohibited. Religious services and First Amendment activities are also allowed but must follow social distancing protocols. However, the 10-person limit doesn’t apply to these gatherings, but they should gather outside unless impossible.

“COVID-19 is still a serious threat to our state, and Phase 1 is designed to be a limited easing of restrictions that can boost parts of our economy while keeping important safety rules in place,” said Governor Cooper. “This is a careful and deliberate first step, guided by the data, and North Carolinians still must use caution while this virus is circulating.”

Those who do decide to go out they are encouraged to wear a face mask, carry hand sanitizer, wash their hands whenever possible, and regularly clean high-touch surfaces.

“When leaving home and wear it inside all public settings such as grocery stores, pharmacies, or other retail or public-serving businesses. A Face Covering should also be worn outdoors when you cannot maintain at least six (6) feet distancing from other people with the exception of family or household members. These coverings function to protect other people more than the wearer,” states the Executive Order.

Retail stores can operate at 50 percent capacity. Additionally, customers must stand six feet apart and retailers should provide hand sanitizer, screen employees, and frequently clean.  NCDHHS is posting the screening questionnaire online.

Phase One summary from Gov. Cooper’s office.

Businesses that remain closed are bars, personal care businesses, entertainment venues, and gyms.

Restaurants may only continue to serve customers for drive-through, takeout and delivery.

All employees are encouraged to wear face masks or coverings and Cooper still recommends teleworking whenever possible.

Long-term care facilities are still closed to visitors.

Parks are encouraged to open if they can accommodate social distancing, but playgrounds should remain closed.

Childcare facilities will be open to serve families who need the assistance. The organizations are required to follow strict cleaning protocols. Summer day camps can operate in compliance with NC DHHS guidelines.

In explaining the decision to move to Phase One, Cooper and Secretary Cohen reported North Carolina remains stable on the following key metrics:

  • Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days – North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is decreasing.
  • Trajectory of Lab-Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days – North Carolina’s trajectory of lab-confirmed cases over the last 14 days cases is slightly increasing.
  • Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days – North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive over the last 14 days is decreasing.
  • Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days – North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations over the last 14 days is level.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to be able to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread. These areas include:

  • Laboratory Testing – North Carolina has doubled the daily testing rate.
  • Tracing Capability – The Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative has received over 4,000 applications and is in the process of hiring 250 new contact tracers.
  • Personal Protective Equipment – Supply chains continue to improve with the exception of gowns.

The order is in effect until 5 p,m, on Friday, May 22. However, the end of this Order does not necessarily mean the state will move to Phase Two. Phase Two only start if data and indicators are in the right place.

New Cherokee resident tests positive in isolation

Health, News
resident work-related death

CHEROKEE COUNTY, N.C. PRESS RELEASE – One resident of Cherokee County has tested positive for COVID – 19 and is currently isolated in their home in Cherokee County. This individual was tested after presenting to a local Emergency Department requesting care for a respiratory type illness and has remained isolated since being tested. The Cherokee County Health Department is performing a contact investigation in an effort to identify close contacts of this individual and perform testing, as indicated. This individual has not had contact with anyone known to be infected with COVID-19 or linked to other ongoing investigations.

Recent contact investigations related to (previously) reported cases in Cherokee County have left no clear source of infection and are an indication that community spread is occurring. According to the CDC, community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

In an effort to slow community spread, Cherokee County Health Department is continuing to urge anyone who does not have an essential need to go out into the public to Stay at Home and limit all unnecessary contacts.

Cherokee County Health Department also emphasizes that anyone who becomes ill with a respiratory type illness to isolate until the following criteria are met:

  • At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed since recovery defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), AND
  • At least 7 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

It is also recommended that household and close contacts of persons with a respiratory type illness should quarantine to the extent possible for 14 days and monitor for symptoms of a respiratory illness. If household or close contacts become sick during the 14 day monitoring period, it is advised that they then isolate until the criteria for discontinuation of isolation (listed above) are met.

In addition to isolating as instructed above, if you become sick with a respiratory type illness and are in one of the following categories, please contact the Cherokee County Health Department at 828-837-7486 or your primary care provider to determine if you need to be tested:

  • Healthcare worker
  • 65 years and older
  • Underlying health conditions such as chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma; serious heart conditions; people with weakened immune systems, severe obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis, liver disease.
    • First Responder
    • Essential worker

Because COVID-19 is most commonly spread through respiratory droplets, individuals should take the same measures that health care providers recommend to prevent the spread of the flu and other viruses, including washing your hands, avoiding touching your face, staying home if you are sick and covering coughs and sneezes with your elbow. It is also recommended that all individuals only go into public areas for essential activities. The CDC now recommends that cloth face coverings be worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies).

It is important to make sure the information you are getting about COVID-19 is coming directly from reliable sources like Cherokee County Health Department, CDC, and NCDHHS. For more information, please visit the CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus and NCDHHS’ website at www.ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus, which will also include future positive COVID-19 test results in North Carolina.

Cherokee County Health Department regularly updates our Facebook page with accurate and current information regarding COVID-19, we encourage the public to check our Facebook page for up-to-date information.

Symptoms for COVID-19 are fever, cough, and other lower respiratory illness (shortness of breath). If you are having a mild respiratory illness, isolate yourself from others until the criteria above is met. If your illness becomes severe requiring urgent or emergent health care, call and inform your health care provider or emergency services of your symptoms prior to arrival.
If you have questions, you may call the Health Department at 828-837-7486 during regular office hours which are Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM.

Ninth Cherokee County resident tests positive for COVID-19

Health, News, Press Release
Covid-19

CHEROKEE COUNTY, N.C. – A resident of Cherokee County has tested positive for COVID – 19 and is currently isolated in their home in Cherokee County. This individual is a household contact to the previously reported case believed to have been infected during a visit to Harrah’s Cherokee Valley River Casino. Cherokee County Health Department staff have continued working to identify the source of the infection and contacts. This individual has been isolated since the household member was tested and only came out of isolation to receive medical care.

The CDC is now urging anyone who becomes ill with a respiratory type illness to isolate until the following criteria are met:

  • At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed since recovery defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), AND
  • At least 7 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

It is also recommended that household and close contacts of persons with a respiratory type illness should quarantine to the extent possible for 14 days and monitor for symptoms of a respiratory illness. If household or close contacts become sick during the 14 day monitoring period, it is advised that they then isolate until the criteria for discontinuation of isolation (listed above) are met.

Because COVID-19 is most commonly spread through respiratory droplets, individuals should take the same measures that health care providers recommend to prevent the spread of the flu and other viruses, including washing your hands, avoiding touching your face, staying home if you are sick and covering coughs and sneezes with your elbow. It is also recommended that all individuals only go into public areas for essential activities. The CDC now recommends that cloth face coverings be worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies).

It is important to make sure the information you are getting about COVID-19 is coming directly from reliable sources like Cherokee County Health Department, CDC, and NCDHHS. For more information, please visit
the CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus and NCDHHS’ website at www.ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus, which will also include future positive COVID-19 test results in North Carolina.

Cherokee County Health Department regularly updates our Facebook page with accurate and current information regarding COVID-19, we encourage the public to check our Facebook page for up-to-date information.

Symptoms for COVID-19 are fever, cough, and other lower respiratory illness (shortness of breath). If you are having a mild respiratory illness, isolate yourself from others until the criteria above is met. If your illness becomes severe requiring urgent or emergent health care, call and inform your health care provider or emergency services of your symptoms prior to arrival.
If you have questions, you may call the Health Department at 828-837-7486 during regular office hours which are Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM.

UPDATE: Cooper orders North Carolinians to stay home

News, State & National
Cooper census extension

RALEIGH, N.C. – On Friday, March 27, Gov. Roy Cooper signed Executive order 121 instructing North Carolinians to remain in their homes except for essential activities and essential work. The order takes effect on Monday, March 30 at 5 p.m. and ends on April 29, but can be extended or lifted early.

This is to slow the spread of COVID-19 and keep local hospitals from being overwhelmed with infected patients.

Essential businesses include grocery stores, restaurants – take out and drive-thru only, ABC stores, healthcare providers, pharmacies, hardware stores, post offices, office supply stores, gas stations, convenience stores, veterinarians, pet supply stores, hotels, airlines, public transit, places of worship, child care providers that follow NCDHHS guidelines.

Individuals should stay in their residence except for essential activities, such as grocery shopping, medication, medical appointments, exercise – not in groups larger than 10, essential jobs, etc. At this time, Cooper is seeking voluntary cooperation from the public but can instate law enforcement protocols if necessary.

Social interaction should be limited. People can visit family members to help take care of their medical needs.

People can still go to parks if they remain open.

Businesses that aren’t listed as essential, but owners believe it is to the community, can apply for an exemption with the North Carolina Department of Revenue.

Click here to read FAQs about the order.

Update from March 23 below:

Almost a week after Gov. Roy Cooper ordered restaurants to close all in-dining services, he has issued another order instructing all salons and gyms to close. The Monday, March 23rd conference also told the public that public K-12 schools will remain closed until May 15.

Schools will continue to offer remote instruction until the May date when the situation will be reevaluated.

A list of businesses closing on Wednesday, March 25 at 5 p.m. include gyms, salons, nail salons, barbershops, health clubs, movie theaters, and sweepstakes parlors. Casinos in the state closed last week.

Grocery stores remain open as do restaurants with curbside, takeout, delivery, or drive-thru options. Cooper urged North Carolinians to only buy what they need at the store and leave goods for others who might need it.

New updates and directives are as follows per Executive Order:

Mass Gatherings = 50+ Persons

The new Executive Order modifies Executive Order 117 to limit mass gatherings to no more than 50 people [was 100 people]. Section 1. a.1. of Executive Order 120 provides that a mass gathering is defined as any “event or convening that brings together more than fifty (50) persons in a single room or single space at the same time, such as an auditorium, stadium, arena, large conference room, meeting hall, or any other confined indoor or outdoor space . . . [and includes] parades, fairs and festivals.” Not included in the definition of mass gatherings are normal operations at airports, bus and train stations, medical facilities, shopping malls and shopping centers. It also does not include office environments, factories, grocery stores and child care facilities.

If a church gathering has a coordinated event or convening for more than 50, such gathering would be prohibited under Section 1(a). If a church has more than 50 employees and they come to work, that would fall within the exemption of Section 1(b) because it functions as an office environment.

If a wedding ceremony or reception has more than 50 attendees, that activity would be prohibited under Section 1(a).

A funeral home can continue to conduct retail business in assisting clients with funeral arrangements. However, a funeral that has more than 50 attendees would be prohibited under Section 1(a).

The Executive Order provides that the above restriction on mass gatherings is a Class 2 misdemeanor and shall be enforced by State and local law enforcement officers.

Entertainment Facilities
Section 1.b. of Executive Order 120 requires the closure of entertainment facilities without a retail or dining component. Entertainment facilities that must close include bowling alleys, health clubs, indoor/outdoor pools, skating rinks, indoor exercise facilities, movie theaters, spas, bingo parlors, and gaming establishments.

Gaming establishments that must close include any “gaming and business establishments which allow gaming activities (e.g. video poker, gaming, sweepstakes, video games, arcade games, pinball machines or other computer, electronic or mechanical devices played for amusement.)” A violation of this section is a Class 2 misdemeanor.

If any of these entertainment facilities have a retail or dining component, those may continue to operate within current emergency restrictions. For example, if a spa has a deli or sandwich shop, they can continue to provide take-out food service to customers. In addition, if a health club has a gift shop, they can continue to sell T-shirts and other items from that retail gift shop.

Personal Care and Grooming Businesses
Section 1.c. also requires the closure of personal care and grooming businesses. This includes barber shops, beauty salons, hair salons, nail salons, massage parlors, and tattoo parlors. A violation of this section is a Class 2 misdemeanor.

Long Term Care Visitation Limitations
Executive Order 120 places restrictions on patient visitation in long term care facilities. For a more detailed description of this provision, please view the Executive Order.

Continued School Closure
All public schools are closed through Friday, May 15, 2020.

Original article from March 12 below:

In a March 12, 2020 press conference, Gov. Roy Cooper asked North Carolinians to stay away from gatherings of 100 people or more as Coronavirus cases continue to grow throughout the state.

The voluntary measures apply to conferences, assemblies, sporting events, concerts, and worship services. Cooper also stated these protocols could become mandatory if no one followed through with his suggestions.

Employers are also encouraged to allow employees to work from home.

Cooper willing to put mandatory measures in place if the public doesn’t follow through.

The measures go into effect on Friday, March 13.

“Although North Carolina has not seen as much widespread infection as some other states, I want to provide stronger statewide guidance now,” explained Cooper. “Health experts believe that it will protect the health and safety of North Carolinians and help prevent further spread of the virus. I strongly urge all North Carolinians to follow it and take it seriously.”

Don’t close schools just yet

One call to action differing from much of the rest of the county, state government isn’t calling for preemptive school closings. Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen expanded upon the reasoning during the press conference.

She listed multiple reasons, including children tend to gather other places when not in school, one of which is grandparent’s homes – who are labeled as high risk for catching the virus. Also, many children depend on free or reduced breakfast and lunch as their only meals throughout the school year.

“Those are all significant things that contribute to children’s health, and we want to make sure we’re thinking about that,” Cohen stated.

However, childcare and schools are recommended to cancel or reduce large extracurricular activities or events.

Cohen explained why schools should stay open for now.

Several universities in the state have moved to online classes, but students can remain on campus for now.

Cooper declared a state of emergency in North Carolina last week. As of Thursday, the state had 16 confirmed cases of Coronavirus (COVID-19). The new cases were reported in Wake, Cabarrus, Mecklenburg, Forsyth and Johnston counties.

Images courtesy of N.C. government.

Governor Roy Cooper's COVID-19 Briefing 3-12-2020 4 pm

Gov. Cooper Coronavirus Task Force Update 3/12/20

Posted by Governor Roy Cooper on Thursday, March 12, 2020

 

Three Cherokee County, NC residents and Illinois resident test positive for COVID-19

Health, News
residents

CHEROKEE COUNTY, N.C. – Around 10:30 p.m. on Friday, March 20, Cherokee County Health Department issued a press release concerning four new COVID-19 cases. Three are Cherokee County residents. See the entire release below.

“Two Cherokee County residents that tested positive for COVID – 19 are being monitored and following isolation orders in Cherokee County. The patients are household contacts of the case from New York that tested positive in Cherokee County earlier this week. Both the index case (patient from New York) and the residents from Cherokee County have been isolated since testing was initiated on the patient from New York.

A third Cherokee County resident has tested positive for COVID – 19 and is currently isolated in their home since testing was initiated. This patient attended the contra dance on March 10th at the John C. Campbell Folk School which the New York patient had also attended. The patient is at home on isolation. Cherokee County Health Department will continue necessary contact tracing on this patient in identifying close contacts.

A resident of Illinois that tested positive for COVID – 19 is being monitored and following isolation orders in Cherokee County. The patient had traveled from Illinois and was staying in the home with the index case (patient from New York) that tested positive in Cherokee County earlier this week. Since cases are reported under the state of residency, this case will be identified as an Illinois case, not a North Carolina case. Therefore, this case will not show up on the North Carolina maps as a Cherokee County case. Both the index case from New York and the resident from Illinois are isolated since testing was initiated on the patient from New York.

Both of the Cherokee County individuals and the Illinois case have been on isolation since before becoming symptomatic. For this reason, contact tracing on these three cases will not be necessary. We can say with great certainty that these cases were isolated during the symptomatic phase of the illness and therefore had little to no opportunity to spread the virus.

It is now advised that anyone who becomes ill with a respiratory type illness should isolate until the following criteria are met:

• 7 days have passed since the onset of symptoms; AND
• At least 72 hours without a fever (without the use of fever-reducing medication) and respiratory symptoms are improving

Because COVID-19 is most commonly spread through respiratory droplets, individuals should take the same measures that health care providers recommend to prevent the spread of the flu and other viruses, including washing your hands, avoiding touching your face, staying home if you are sick and covering coughs and sneezes with your elbow.

It is important to make sure the information you are getting about COVID-19 is coming directly from reliable sources like Cherokee County Health Department, CDC, and NCDHHS. For more information, please visit the CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus and NCDHHS’ website at www.ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus, which will also include future positive COVID-19 test results in North Carolina.

Cherokee County Health Department regularly updates our Facebook page with accurate and current information regarding COVID-19, we encourage the public to check our Facebook page for up-to-date information.

Symptoms for COVID-19 are fever, cough, and other lower respiratory illness (shortness of breath). If you are having a mild respiratory illness, isolate yourself from others until the criteria above is met. If your illness becomes severe requiring urgent or emergent health care, call and inform your health care provider or emergency services of your symptoms prior to arrival. If you have questions, you may call the Health Department at 828-837-7486 during regular office hours which are Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM.”

N.C. residents can dial 2-1-1 to gain COVID-19 information

Community, Lifestyle, Press Release

RALEIGH, N.C. – The State of North Carolina has a dedicated referral and information service (2-1-1) for residents to use to find out more information about COVID-19.

nc211.org is an information and referral service that families and individuals can call to obtain free and confidential information on health and human services resources within their community. NC 2-1-1 operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and resources are available in most languages.

“Services like NC 2-1-1 are critical during times of emergency,” said Governor Cooper. “North Carolinians can now call 2-1-1 to get the information they need while we continue working together to prevent the spread of this virus.”

North Carolinians can text COVIDNC to 898211 to receive general information and updates about COVID-19. Sign up now to get regular alerts on the rapidly evolving situation and North Carolina’s response.

NC 2-1-1 can refer callers to the organizations in their local community best equipped to address their specific health and human services needs including food, shelter, energy assistance, housing, parenting resources, health care, employment, substance abuse treatment, as well as specific resources for older adults and for persons with disabilities, and much more. Simply dial 2-1-1 or TTY 888-892-1162 for assistance.

NC 2-1-1 cannot provide direct medical services, and COVID-19 can only be diagnosed by a health care professional. If you suspect you or someone you care for may have symptoms or have been exposed to the virus, you should contact your health care provider. If you do not have a provider, you can call your local health department, free and charitable clinics or a Federally Qualified Health Clinic for guidance.

People should only call 9-1-1 if they are experiencing an emergency. 9-1-1 centers across North Carolina have been receiving general questions and other non-emergency calls related to COVID-19. Please do not call 9-1-1 unless you have an emergency.

For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19 in North Carolina, go to ncdhhs.gov/coronavirus.

Due to anticipated high call volume, those seeking general information about COVID-19 are strongly encouraged to sign up for texts. People who are trying to locate specific services would benefit by calling. To learn more about NC 2-1-1, visit NC 2-1-1.

Cherokee County E-911 Communications overrun with calls

Community, News

Murphy, Nc. – Road conditions and the continued snowfall is putting a strain on Cherokee County E-911 Communications.

With roadways already wet before the thick snow fell, ice has formed in areas causing driving conditions to be hazardous. Many roadways are impassable due to these conditions, and there are reports of roadways being closed due to stranded vehicles.

Cherokee County E-911 Communications tells the public in a statement, “The center is inundated with calls from motorists traveling on the ice/snow covered roadways.”

Residents and travelers are urged to call the county’s non-emergency line at 828-835-3144 if they are need of assistance but it is not an emergency. E-911 Communications does say that non-emergency calls will be addressed in the order they are received, and to expect to be placed on hold while personnel handles “true emergencies”.

If you are experiencing a life threatening emergency do call 911.

Cherokee County E-911 Communications released the following information for those needing assistance:

If you have a Life Threatening Emergency dial 911.

 If you need road condition information dial 511 from a cell phone, (877) 511-4662 from outside North Carolina or visit www.ncdot.gov.

If you do not have an emergency and need to contact the NC Highway Patrol State Highway Patrol main office number: (919) 733-7952. 

Motorists traveling through the state who need assistance may dial *47 which is *HP on a cellular phone. 

Like emergency personnel in neighboring counties, Cherokee County Emergency Services are asking all residents to remain at home unless absolutely necessary to travel. They are also asking residents to please stay off roadways while crews respond to emergencies and work to clear the roads.

FYN will bring you weather updates throughout the day.

Cherokee County Sheriff’s office warns of Possible Police Impersonator

News

Murphy, NC    The Cherokee County Sheriff’s office states it has received reports of a white 2019 Ford Explorer with a regular car tag on it operating blue lights that has been stopping individuals in the Cherokee County Area.  They do not have a vehicle as described above. If you should  encounter that particular vehicle please contact Cherokee County Emergency Communications at 828-835-3144 so that they can determine if this an official vehicle or an impostor (blue light bandit).

If for some reason an unmarked car attempts to stop you in an area that you feel unsafe please call 911 and find a safe area to stop until such time as they can ensure the stop is legitimate.

Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office Press Release: MAN SENTENCED FOR CHILD SEX CRIME

Arrest Reports, Police & Government

CHEROKEE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE
SHERIFF DERRICK PALMER
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, December 17, 2018
For more information call 828.837.2589


MAN SENTENCED FOR CHILD SEX CRIME

Murphy, NC— On December 04th, 2018 ,Robert J Tyndell, of Murphy North Carolina was sentenced to 2 terms of imprisonment of a minimum term of 13 months to a maximum term of 25 months with 745 days credit to be applied to the second sentence for his plea of guilty to the 2 charges of Indecent Liberties with a Child announced Sheriff Derrick Palmer of the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office. The Honorable Superior Court Judge William H. Coward ordered Tyndell to register as a sex offender for a period of 30 years and to have no contact with the victim for a lifetime.

Robert , Tyndell,Murphy ,North Carolina,nc,  sex offender,Cherokee ,Sheriff,Press Release,CHILD, SEX ,CRIME,Kids Place Child Advocacy Center

Robert J Tyndell,

In July of 2016 the Macon County Department of Social Services opened an investigation and reported to the Cherokee County Department of Social Services and the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office allegations that Tyndell had sexually assaulted a child under the age of 12 at a Murphy North Carolina address. The initial disclosure was in Macon County North Carolina. The joint investigation was assisted by Kids Place Child Advocacy Center in Franklin North Carolina.

The investigation was presented to the November 14th, 2016 setting of the Cherokee County Grand Jury which handed down Indictments for Statutory First Degree Sex Offense of a Child, and two counts of Indecent Liberties with a child.

Tyndell was arrested at his Murphy North Carolina residence and incarcerated in the Cherokee County Detention Center.

Sheriff Derrick Palmer stated “Again we see how utilizing all our resources several agencies worked together helped to bring this case to court.”

To report suspicious activity and suspect violations of the law please call 828-837-1344 or submit a tip at [email protected]

Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office Press Release: LOCAL MAN SENTENCED FOR CHILD SEX CRIME

Arrest Reports, Police & Government

CHEROKEE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE
SHERIFF DERRICK PALMER
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, December 17, 2018
For more information call 828.837.2589


LOCAL MAN SENTENCED FOR CHILD SEX CRIME

Murphy, NC— On December 04th, 2018 Barry Wade Allen, of Murphy North Carolina was sentenced to a term of imprisonment of a minimum term of 17 months to a maximum term of 35 months with 427 days credit for his plea of guilty to the charge of Indecent Liberties with a Child announced Sheriff Derrick Palmer of the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office. The Honorable Superior Court Judge William H. Coward ordered Allen to register as a sex offender for a period of 30 years and to have no contact with the victim for a lifetime. In June of 2017 the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office received a report of suspected sexual assault committed by Allen. The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the HAVEN Child Advocacy Center.

The case was presented to the Grand Jury which met in July 2017 who returned true bills of indictment for Statutory Sex Offense with a Child greater than 13 years of age and defendant 6 years or more older, and Indecent Liberties with a Child.

Barry, Wade ,Allen,Murphy ,North Carolina,nc,  sex offender,Cherokee ,Sheriff,Press Release,CHILD, SEX ,CRIME,HAVEN Child Advocacy Center

Barry Wade Allen

Allen fled from Cherokee County prior to the true bills being issued. The United States Marshal Fugitive Apprehension Unit assisted in locating and apprehending Allen in Louisiana during the last week of September 2017. Allen waived extradition and returned to Cherokee
County.

Sheriff Derrick Palmer stated “These are difficult and trying cases on all concerned. This is an excellent example of how working as a team involving HAVEN Child Advocacy Center, the District Attorney’s Office and utilizing our Federal partners helped bring this case to court.”

To report suspicious activity and suspect violations of the law please call 828-837-1344 or submit a tip at [email protected]

Become A Sponsor For The Christmas Clash Presented By Team FYN Sports

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Team FYN Sports will be broadcasting live the Blue Ridge Christmas Clash. Sponsorship opportunities are still available. Support your local youth and sports and market your company at the same time. Contact us now @ [email protected] or 706.276.6397

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